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* [RFC/RFT] [PATCH v3 0/4] Intel_pstate: HWP Dynamic performance boost
@ 2018-05-31 22:51 Srinivas Pandruvada
  2018-05-31 22:51 ` [RFC/RFT] [PATCH v3 1/4] cpufreq: intel_pstate: Add HWP boost utility and sched util hooks Srinivas Pandruvada
                   ` (5 more replies)
  0 siblings, 6 replies; 13+ messages in thread
From: Srinivas Pandruvada @ 2018-05-31 22:51 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: lenb, rjw, peterz, mgorman
  Cc: linux-pm, linux-kernel, juri.lelli, viresh.kumar, Srinivas Pandruvada

v3
- Removed atomic bit operation as suggested.
- Added description of contention with user space.
- Removed hwp cache, boost utililty function patch and merged with util callback
  patch. This way any value set is used somewhere.

Waiting for test results from Mel Gorman, who is the original reporter.

v2
This is a much simpler version than the previous one and only consider IO
boost, using the existing mechanism. There is no change in this series
beyond intel_pstate driver.

Once PeterZ finishes his work on frequency invariant, I will revisit
thread migration optimization in HWP mode.

Other changes:
- Gradual boost instead of single step as suggested by PeterZ.
- Cross CPU synchronization concerns identified by Rafael.
- Split the patch for HWP MSR value caching as suggested by PeterZ.

Not changed as suggested:
There is no architecture way to identify platform with Per-core
P-states, so still have to enable feature based on CPU model.

-----------
v1

This series tries to address some concern in performance particularly with IO
workloads (Reported by Mel Gorman), when HWP is using intel_pstate powersave
policy.

Background
HWP performance can be controlled by user space using sysfs interface for
max/min frequency limits and energy performance preference settings. Based on
workload characteristics these can be adjusted from user space. These limits
are not changed dynamically by kernel based on workload.

By default HWP defaults to energy performance preference value of 0x80 on
majority of platforms(Scale is 0-255, 0 is max performance and 255 is min).
This value offers best performance/watt and for majority of server workloads
performance doesn't suffer. Also users always have option to use performance
policy of intel_pstate, to get best performance. But user tend to run with
out of box configuration, which is powersave policy on most of the distros.

In some case it is possible to dynamically adjust performance, for example,
when a CPU is woken up due to IO completion or thread migrate to a new CPU. In
this case HWP algorithm will take some time to build utilization and ramp up
P-states. So this may results in lower performance for some IO workloads and
workloads which tend to migrate. The idea of this patch series is to
temporarily boost performance dynamically in these cases. This is only
applicable only when user is using powersave policy, not in performance policy.

Results on a Skylake server:

Benchmark                       Improvement %
----------------------------------------------------------------------
dbench                          50.36
thread IO bench (tiobench)      10.35
File IO                         9.81
sqlite                          15.76
X264 -104 cores                 9.75

Spec Power                      (Negligible impact 7382 Vs. 7378)
Idle Power                      No change observed
-----------------------------------------------------------------------

HWP brings in best performace/watt at EPP=0x80. Since we are boosting
EPP here to 0, the performance/watt drops upto 10%. So there is a power
penalty of these changes.

Also Mel Gorman provided test results on a prior patchset, which shows
benifits of this series.

Srinivas Pandruvada (4):
  cpufreq: intel_pstate: Add HWP boost utility and sched util hooks
  cpufreq: intel_pstate: HWP boost performance on IO wakeup
  cpufreq: intel_pstate: New sysfs entry to control HWP boost
  cpufreq: intel_pstate: enable boost for SKX

 drivers/cpufreq/intel_pstate.c | 177 ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++-
 1 file changed, 173 insertions(+), 4 deletions(-)

-- 
2.13.6

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 13+ messages in thread

* [RFC/RFT] [PATCH v3 1/4] cpufreq: intel_pstate: Add HWP boost utility and sched util hooks
  2018-05-31 22:51 [RFC/RFT] [PATCH v3 0/4] Intel_pstate: HWP Dynamic performance boost Srinivas Pandruvada
@ 2018-05-31 22:51 ` Srinivas Pandruvada
  2018-06-05  9:27   ` Rafael J. Wysocki
  2018-05-31 22:51 ` [RFC/RFT] [PATCH v3 2/4] cpufreq: intel_pstate: HWP boost performance on IO wakeup Srinivas Pandruvada
                   ` (4 subsequent siblings)
  5 siblings, 1 reply; 13+ messages in thread
From: Srinivas Pandruvada @ 2018-05-31 22:51 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: lenb, rjw, peterz, mgorman
  Cc: linux-pm, linux-kernel, juri.lelli, viresh.kumar, Srinivas Pandruvada

Added two utility functions to HWP boost up gradually and boost down to
the default cached HWP request values.

Boost up:
Boost up updates HWP request minimum value in steps. This minimum value
can reach upto at HWP request maximum values depends on how frequently,
this boost up function is called. At max, boost up will take three steps
to reach the maximum, depending on the current HWP request levels and HWP
capabilities. For example, if the current settings are:
If P0 (Turbo max) = P1 (Guaranteed max) = min
        No boost at all.
If P0 (Turbo max) > P1 (Guaranteed max) = min
        Should result in one level boost only for P0.
If P0 (Turbo max) = P1 (Guaranteed max) > min
        Should result in two level boost:
                (min + p1)/2 and P1.
If P0 (Turbo max) > P1 (Guaranteed max) > min
        Should result in three level boost:
                (min + p1)/2, P1 and P0.
We don't set any level between P0 and P1 as there is no guarantee that
they will be honored.

Boost down:
After the system is idle for hold time of 3ms, the HWP request is reset
to the default value from HWP init or user modified one via sysfs.

Caching of HWP Request and Capabilities
Store the HWP request value last set using MSR_HWP_REQUEST and read
MSR_HWP_CAPABILITIES. This avoid reading of MSRs in the boost utility
functions.

These boost utility functions calculated limits are based on the latest
HWP request value, which can be modified by setpolicy() callback. So if
user space modifies the minimum perf value, that will be accounted for
every time the boost up is called. There will be case when there can be
contention with the user modified minimum perf, in that case user value
will gain precedence. For example just before HWP_REQUEST MSR is updated
from setpolicy() callback, the boost up function is called via scheduler
tick callback. Here the cached MSR value is already the latest and limits
are updated based on the latest user limits, but on return the MSR write
callback called from setpolicy() callback will update the HWP_REQUEST
value. This will be used till next time the boost up function is called.

In addition add a variable to control HWP dynamic boosting. When HWP
dynamic boost is active then set the HWP specific update util hook. The
contents in the utility hooks will be filled in the subsequent patches.

Signed-off-by: Srinivas Pandruvada <srinivas.pandruvada@linux.intel.com>
---
 drivers/cpufreq/intel_pstate.c | 99 ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++--
 1 file changed, 95 insertions(+), 4 deletions(-)

diff --git a/drivers/cpufreq/intel_pstate.c b/drivers/cpufreq/intel_pstate.c
index 17e566afbb41..80bf61ae4b1f 100644
--- a/drivers/cpufreq/intel_pstate.c
+++ b/drivers/cpufreq/intel_pstate.c
@@ -221,6 +221,9 @@ struct global_params {
  *			preference/bias
  * @epp_saved:		Saved EPP/EPB during system suspend or CPU offline
  *			operation
+ * @hwp_req_cached:	Cached value of the last HWP Request MSR
+ * @hwp_cap_cached:	Cached value of the last HWP Capabilities MSR
+ * @hwp_boost_min:	Last HWP boosted min performance
  *
  * This structure stores per CPU instance data for all CPUs.
  */
@@ -253,6 +256,9 @@ struct cpudata {
 	s16 epp_policy;
 	s16 epp_default;
 	s16 epp_saved;
+	u64 hwp_req_cached;
+	u64 hwp_cap_cached;
+	int hwp_boost_min;
 };
 
 static struct cpudata **all_cpu_data;
@@ -285,6 +291,7 @@ static struct pstate_funcs pstate_funcs __read_mostly;
 
 static int hwp_active __read_mostly;
 static bool per_cpu_limits __read_mostly;
+static bool hwp_boost __read_mostly;
 
 static struct cpufreq_driver *intel_pstate_driver __read_mostly;
 
@@ -689,6 +696,7 @@ static void intel_pstate_get_hwp_max(unsigned int cpu, int *phy_max,
 	u64 cap;
 
 	rdmsrl_on_cpu(cpu, MSR_HWP_CAPABILITIES, &cap);
+	WRITE_ONCE(all_cpu_data[cpu]->hwp_cap_cached, cap);
 	if (global.no_turbo)
 		*current_max = HWP_GUARANTEED_PERF(cap);
 	else
@@ -763,6 +771,7 @@ static void intel_pstate_hwp_set(unsigned int cpu)
 		intel_pstate_set_epb(cpu, epp);
 	}
 skip_epp:
+	WRITE_ONCE(cpu_data->hwp_req_cached, value);
 	wrmsrl_on_cpu(cpu, MSR_HWP_REQUEST, value);
 }
 
@@ -1381,6 +1390,81 @@ static void intel_pstate_get_cpu_pstates(struct cpudata *cpu)
 	intel_pstate_set_min_pstate(cpu);
 }
 
+/*
+ * Long hold time will keep high perf limits for long time,
+ * which negatively impacts perf/watt for some workloads,
+ * like specpower. 3ms is based on experiements on some
+ * workoads.
+ */
+static int hwp_boost_hold_time_ms = 3;
+
+static inline void intel_pstate_hwp_boost_up(struct cpudata *cpu)
+{
+	u64 hwp_req = READ_ONCE(cpu->hwp_req_cached);
+	int max_limit = (hwp_req & 0xff00) >> 8;
+	int min_limit = (hwp_req & 0xff);
+	int boost_level1;
+
+	/*
+	 * Cases to consider (User changes via sysfs or boot time):
+	 * If, P0 (Turbo max) = P1 (Guaranteed max) = min:
+	 *	No boost, return.
+	 * If, P0 (Turbo max) > P1 (Guaranteed max) = min:
+	 *     Should result in one level boost only for P0.
+	 * If, P0 (Turbo max) = P1 (Guaranteed max) > min:
+	 *     Should result in two level boost:
+	 *         (min + p1)/2 and P1.
+	 * If, P0 (Turbo max) > P1 (Guaranteed max) > min:
+	 *     Should result in three level boost:
+	 *        (min + p1)/2, P1 and P0.
+	 */
+
+	/* If max and min are equal or already at max, nothing to boost */
+	if (max_limit == min_limit || cpu->hwp_boost_min >= max_limit)
+		return;
+
+	if (!cpu->hwp_boost_min)
+		cpu->hwp_boost_min = min_limit;
+
+	/* level at half way mark between min and guranteed */
+	boost_level1 = (HWP_GUARANTEED_PERF(cpu->hwp_cap_cached) + min_limit) >> 1;
+
+	if (cpu->hwp_boost_min < boost_level1)
+		cpu->hwp_boost_min = boost_level1;
+	else if (cpu->hwp_boost_min < HWP_GUARANTEED_PERF(cpu->hwp_cap_cached))
+		cpu->hwp_boost_min = HWP_GUARANTEED_PERF(cpu->hwp_cap_cached);
+	else if (cpu->hwp_boost_min == HWP_GUARANTEED_PERF(cpu->hwp_cap_cached) &&
+		 max_limit != HWP_GUARANTEED_PERF(cpu->hwp_cap_cached))
+		cpu->hwp_boost_min = max_limit;
+	else
+		return;
+
+	hwp_req = (hwp_req & ~GENMASK_ULL(7, 0)) | cpu->hwp_boost_min;
+	wrmsrl(MSR_HWP_REQUEST, hwp_req);
+	cpu->last_update = cpu->sample.time;
+}
+
+static inline void intel_pstate_hwp_boost_down(struct cpudata *cpu)
+{
+	if (cpu->hwp_boost_min) {
+		bool expired;
+
+		/* Check if we are idle for hold time to boost down */
+		expired = time_after64(cpu->sample.time, cpu->last_update +
+				       (hwp_boost_hold_time_ms * NSEC_PER_MSEC));
+		if (expired) {
+			wrmsrl(MSR_HWP_REQUEST, cpu->hwp_req_cached);
+			cpu->hwp_boost_min = 0;
+		}
+	}
+	cpu->last_update = cpu->sample.time;
+}
+
+static inline void intel_pstate_update_util_hwp(struct update_util_data *data,
+						u64 time, unsigned int flags)
+{
+}
+
 static inline void intel_pstate_calc_avg_perf(struct cpudata *cpu)
 {
 	struct sample *sample = &cpu->sample;
@@ -1684,7 +1768,7 @@ static void intel_pstate_set_update_util_hook(unsigned int cpu_num)
 {
 	struct cpudata *cpu = all_cpu_data[cpu_num];
 
-	if (hwp_active)
+	if (hwp_active && !hwp_boost)
 		return;
 
 	if (cpu->update_util_set)
@@ -1692,8 +1776,12 @@ static void intel_pstate_set_update_util_hook(unsigned int cpu_num)
 
 	/* Prevent intel_pstate_update_util() from using stale data. */
 	cpu->sample.time = 0;
-	cpufreq_add_update_util_hook(cpu_num, &cpu->update_util,
-				     intel_pstate_update_util);
+	if (hwp_active)
+		cpufreq_add_update_util_hook(cpu_num, &cpu->update_util,
+					     intel_pstate_update_util_hwp);
+	else
+		cpufreq_add_update_util_hook(cpu_num, &cpu->update_util,
+					     intel_pstate_update_util);
 	cpu->update_util_set = true;
 }
 
@@ -1805,8 +1893,11 @@ static int intel_pstate_set_policy(struct cpufreq_policy *policy)
 		intel_pstate_set_update_util_hook(policy->cpu);
 	}
 
-	if (hwp_active)
+	if (hwp_active) {
+		if (!hwp_boost)
+			intel_pstate_clear_update_util_hook(policy->cpu);
 		intel_pstate_hwp_set(policy->cpu);
+	}
 
 	mutex_unlock(&intel_pstate_limits_lock);
 
-- 
2.13.6

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 13+ messages in thread

* [RFC/RFT] [PATCH v3 2/4] cpufreq: intel_pstate: HWP boost performance on IO wakeup
  2018-05-31 22:51 [RFC/RFT] [PATCH v3 0/4] Intel_pstate: HWP Dynamic performance boost Srinivas Pandruvada
  2018-05-31 22:51 ` [RFC/RFT] [PATCH v3 1/4] cpufreq: intel_pstate: Add HWP boost utility and sched util hooks Srinivas Pandruvada
@ 2018-05-31 22:51 ` Srinivas Pandruvada
  2018-05-31 22:51 ` [RFC/RFT] [PATCH v3 3/4] cpufreq: intel_pstate: New sysfs entry to control HWP boost Srinivas Pandruvada
                   ` (3 subsequent siblings)
  5 siblings, 0 replies; 13+ messages in thread
From: Srinivas Pandruvada @ 2018-05-31 22:51 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: lenb, rjw, peterz, mgorman
  Cc: linux-pm, linux-kernel, juri.lelli, viresh.kumar, Srinivas Pandruvada

This change uses SCHED_CPUFREQ_IOWAIT flag to boost HWP performance.
Since SCHED_CPUFREQ_IOWAIT flag is set frequently, we don't start
boosting steps unless we see two consecutive flags in two ticks. This
avoids boosting due to IO because of regular system activities.

To avoid synchronization issues, the actual processing of the flag is
done on the local CPU callback.

Signed-off-by: Srinivas Pandruvada <srinivas.pandruvada@linux.intel.com>
---
 drivers/cpufreq/intel_pstate.c | 39 +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
 1 file changed, 39 insertions(+)

diff --git a/drivers/cpufreq/intel_pstate.c b/drivers/cpufreq/intel_pstate.c
index 80bf61ae4b1f..2a14756d958e 100644
--- a/drivers/cpufreq/intel_pstate.c
+++ b/drivers/cpufreq/intel_pstate.c
@@ -223,6 +223,8 @@ struct global_params {
  *			operation
  * @hwp_req_cached:	Cached value of the last HWP Request MSR
  * @hwp_cap_cached:	Cached value of the last HWP Capabilities MSR
+ * @last_io_update:	Last time when IO wake flag was set
+ * @sched_flags:	Store scheduler flags for possible cross CPU update
  * @hwp_boost_min:	Last HWP boosted min performance
  *
  * This structure stores per CPU instance data for all CPUs.
@@ -258,6 +260,8 @@ struct cpudata {
 	s16 epp_saved;
 	u64 hwp_req_cached;
 	u64 hwp_cap_cached;
+	u64 last_io_update;
+	unsigned int sched_flags;
 	int hwp_boost_min;
 };
 
@@ -1460,9 +1464,44 @@ static inline void intel_pstate_hwp_boost_down(struct cpudata *cpu)
 	cpu->last_update = cpu->sample.time;
 }
 
+static inline void intel_pstate_update_util_hwp_local(struct cpudata *cpu,
+						      u64 time)
+{
+	cpu->sample.time = time;
+
+	if (cpu->sched_flags & SCHED_CPUFREQ_IOWAIT) {
+		bool do_io = false;
+
+		cpu->sched_flags = 0;
+		/*
+		 * Set iowait_boost flag and update time. Since IO WAIT flag
+		 * is set all the time, we can't just conclude that there is
+		 * some IO bound activity is scheduled on this CPU with just
+		 * one occurrence. If we receive at least two in two
+		 * consecutive ticks, then we treat as boost candidate.
+		 */
+		if (time_before64(time, cpu->last_io_update + 2 * TICK_NSEC))
+			do_io = true;
+
+		cpu->last_io_update = time;
+
+		if (do_io)
+			intel_pstate_hwp_boost_up(cpu);
+
+	} else {
+		intel_pstate_hwp_boost_down(cpu);
+	}
+}
+
 static inline void intel_pstate_update_util_hwp(struct update_util_data *data,
 						u64 time, unsigned int flags)
 {
+	struct cpudata *cpu = container_of(data, struct cpudata, update_util);
+
+	cpu->sched_flags |= flags;
+
+	if (smp_processor_id() == cpu->cpu)
+		intel_pstate_update_util_hwp_local(cpu, time);
 }
 
 static inline void intel_pstate_calc_avg_perf(struct cpudata *cpu)
-- 
2.13.6

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 13+ messages in thread

* [RFC/RFT] [PATCH v3 3/4] cpufreq: intel_pstate: New sysfs entry to control HWP boost
  2018-05-31 22:51 [RFC/RFT] [PATCH v3 0/4] Intel_pstate: HWP Dynamic performance boost Srinivas Pandruvada
  2018-05-31 22:51 ` [RFC/RFT] [PATCH v3 1/4] cpufreq: intel_pstate: Add HWP boost utility and sched util hooks Srinivas Pandruvada
  2018-05-31 22:51 ` [RFC/RFT] [PATCH v3 2/4] cpufreq: intel_pstate: HWP boost performance on IO wakeup Srinivas Pandruvada
@ 2018-05-31 22:51 ` Srinivas Pandruvada
  2018-05-31 22:51 ` [RFC/RFT] [PATCH v3 4/4] cpufreq: intel_pstate: enable boost for SKX Srinivas Pandruvada
                   ` (2 subsequent siblings)
  5 siblings, 0 replies; 13+ messages in thread
From: Srinivas Pandruvada @ 2018-05-31 22:51 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: lenb, rjw, peterz, mgorman
  Cc: linux-pm, linux-kernel, juri.lelli, viresh.kumar, Srinivas Pandruvada

A new attribute is added to intel_pstate sysfs to enable/disable
HWP dynamic performance boost.

Signed-off-by: Srinivas Pandruvada <srinivas.pandruvada@linux.intel.com>
---
 drivers/cpufreq/intel_pstate.c | 30 ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
 1 file changed, 30 insertions(+)

diff --git a/drivers/cpufreq/intel_pstate.c b/drivers/cpufreq/intel_pstate.c
index 2a14756d958e..254e30a6c1e0 100644
--- a/drivers/cpufreq/intel_pstate.c
+++ b/drivers/cpufreq/intel_pstate.c
@@ -1033,6 +1033,30 @@ static ssize_t store_min_perf_pct(struct kobject *a, struct attribute *b,
 	return count;
 }
 
+static ssize_t show_hwp_dynamic_boost(struct kobject *kobj,
+				struct attribute *attr, char *buf)
+{
+	return sprintf(buf, "%u\n", hwp_boost);
+}
+
+static ssize_t store_hwp_dynamic_boost(struct kobject *a, struct attribute *b,
+				       const char *buf, size_t count)
+{
+	unsigned int input;
+	int ret;
+
+	ret = kstrtouint(buf, 10, &input);
+	if (ret)
+		return ret;
+
+	mutex_lock(&intel_pstate_driver_lock);
+	hwp_boost = !!input;
+	intel_pstate_update_policies();
+	mutex_unlock(&intel_pstate_driver_lock);
+
+	return count;
+}
+
 show_one(max_perf_pct, max_perf_pct);
 show_one(min_perf_pct, min_perf_pct);
 
@@ -1042,6 +1066,7 @@ define_one_global_rw(max_perf_pct);
 define_one_global_rw(min_perf_pct);
 define_one_global_ro(turbo_pct);
 define_one_global_ro(num_pstates);
+define_one_global_rw(hwp_dynamic_boost);
 
 static struct attribute *intel_pstate_attributes[] = {
 	&status.attr,
@@ -1082,6 +1107,11 @@ static void __init intel_pstate_sysfs_expose_params(void)
 	rc = sysfs_create_file(intel_pstate_kobject, &min_perf_pct.attr);
 	WARN_ON(rc);
 
+	if (hwp_active) {
+		rc = sysfs_create_file(intel_pstate_kobject,
+				       &hwp_dynamic_boost.attr);
+		WARN_ON(rc);
+	}
 }
 /************************** sysfs end ************************/
 
-- 
2.13.6

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 13+ messages in thread

* [RFC/RFT] [PATCH v3 4/4] cpufreq: intel_pstate: enable boost for SKX
  2018-05-31 22:51 [RFC/RFT] [PATCH v3 0/4] Intel_pstate: HWP Dynamic performance boost Srinivas Pandruvada
                   ` (2 preceding siblings ...)
  2018-05-31 22:51 ` [RFC/RFT] [PATCH v3 3/4] cpufreq: intel_pstate: New sysfs entry to control HWP boost Srinivas Pandruvada
@ 2018-05-31 22:51 ` Srinivas Pandruvada
  2018-06-01 12:01   ` Giovanni Gherdovich
  2018-06-01 11:32 ` [RFC/RFT] [PATCH v3 0/4] Intel_pstate: HWP Dynamic performance boost Giovanni Gherdovich
  2018-06-04 18:01 ` Giovanni Gherdovich
  5 siblings, 1 reply; 13+ messages in thread
From: Srinivas Pandruvada @ 2018-05-31 22:51 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: lenb, rjw, peterz, mgorman
  Cc: linux-pm, linux-kernel, juri.lelli, viresh.kumar, Srinivas Pandruvada

Enable HWP boost on Skylake server platform.

Signed-off-by: Srinivas Pandruvada <srinivas.pandruvada@linux.intel.com>
---
 drivers/cpufreq/intel_pstate.c | 9 +++++++++
 1 file changed, 9 insertions(+)

diff --git a/drivers/cpufreq/intel_pstate.c b/drivers/cpufreq/intel_pstate.c
index 254e30a6c1e0..75c5a95bc0ac 100644
--- a/drivers/cpufreq/intel_pstate.c
+++ b/drivers/cpufreq/intel_pstate.c
@@ -1794,6 +1794,11 @@ static const struct x86_cpu_id intel_pstate_cpu_ee_disable_ids[] = {
 	{}
 };
 
+static const struct x86_cpu_id intel_pstate_hwp_boost_ids[] __initconst = {
+	ICPU(INTEL_FAM6_SKYLAKE_X, core_funcs),
+	{}
+};
+
 static int intel_pstate_init_cpu(unsigned int cpunum)
 {
 	struct cpudata *cpu;
@@ -1824,6 +1829,10 @@ static int intel_pstate_init_cpu(unsigned int cpunum)
 			intel_pstate_disable_ee(cpunum);
 
 		intel_pstate_hwp_enable(cpu);
+
+		id = x86_match_cpu(intel_pstate_hwp_boost_ids);
+		if (id)
+			hwp_boost = true;
 	}
 
 	intel_pstate_get_cpu_pstates(cpu);
-- 
2.13.6

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 13+ messages in thread

* Re: [RFC/RFT] [PATCH v3 0/4] Intel_pstate: HWP Dynamic performance boost
  2018-05-31 22:51 [RFC/RFT] [PATCH v3 0/4] Intel_pstate: HWP Dynamic performance boost Srinivas Pandruvada
                   ` (3 preceding siblings ...)
  2018-05-31 22:51 ` [RFC/RFT] [PATCH v3 4/4] cpufreq: intel_pstate: enable boost for SKX Srinivas Pandruvada
@ 2018-06-01 11:32 ` Giovanni Gherdovich
  2018-06-01 14:57   ` Srinivas Pandruvada
  2018-06-04 18:01 ` Giovanni Gherdovich
  5 siblings, 1 reply; 13+ messages in thread
From: Giovanni Gherdovich @ 2018-06-01 11:32 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: Srinivas Pandruvada
  Cc: lenb, rjw, peterz, mgorman, linux-pm, linux-kernel, juri.lelli,
	viresh.kumar

On Thu, May 31, 2018 at 03:51:39PM -0700, Srinivas Pandruvada wrote:
> v3
> - Removed atomic bit operation as suggested.
> - Added description of contention with user space.
> - Removed hwp cache, boost utililty function patch and merged with util callback
>   patch. This way any value set is used somewhere.
> 
> Waiting for test results from Mel Gorman, who is the original reporter.
> 

Hello Srinivas,

thanks for this series. I'm testing it on behalf of Mel; while I'm waiting for
more benchmarks to finish, an initial report I've got from dbench on ext4
looks very promising. Good!
Later when I have it all I'll post my detailed results.


Giovanni Gherdovich
SUSE Labs


> v2
> This is a much simpler version than the previous one and only consider IO
> boost, using the existing mechanism. There is no change in this series
> beyond intel_pstate driver.
> 
> Once PeterZ finishes his work on frequency invariant, I will revisit
> thread migration optimization in HWP mode.
> 
> Other changes:
> - Gradual boost instead of single step as suggested by PeterZ.
> - Cross CPU synchronization concerns identified by Rafael.
> - Split the patch for HWP MSR value caching as suggested by PeterZ.
> 
> Not changed as suggested:
> There is no architecture way to identify platform with Per-core
> P-states, so still have to enable feature based on CPU model.
> 
> -----------
> v1
> 
> This series tries to address some concern in performance particularly with IO
> workloads (Reported by Mel Gorman), when HWP is using intel_pstate powersave
> policy.
> 
> Background
> HWP performance can be controlled by user space using sysfs interface for
> max/min frequency limits and energy performance preference settings. Based on
> workload characteristics these can be adjusted from user space. These limits
> are not changed dynamically by kernel based on workload.
> 
> By default HWP defaults to energy performance preference value of 0x80 on
> majority of platforms(Scale is 0-255, 0 is max performance and 255 is min).
> This value offers best performance/watt and for majority of server workloads
> performance doesn't suffer. Also users always have option to use performance
> policy of intel_pstate, to get best performance. But user tend to run with
> out of box configuration, which is powersave policy on most of the distros.
> 
> In some case it is possible to dynamically adjust performance, for example,
> when a CPU is woken up due to IO completion or thread migrate to a new CPU. In
> this case HWP algorithm will take some time to build utilization and ramp up
> P-states. So this may results in lower performance for some IO workloads and
> workloads which tend to migrate. The idea of this patch series is to
> temporarily boost performance dynamically in these cases. This is only
> applicable only when user is using powersave policy, not in performance policy.
> 
> Results on a Skylake server:
> 
> Benchmark                       Improvement %
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
> dbench                          50.36
> thread IO bench (tiobench)      10.35
> File IO                         9.81
> sqlite                          15.76
> X264 -104 cores                 9.75
> 
> Spec Power                      (Negligible impact 7382 Vs. 7378)
> Idle Power                      No change observed
> -----------------------------------------------------------------------
> 
> HWP brings in best performace/watt at EPP=0x80. Since we are boosting
> EPP here to 0, the performance/watt drops upto 10%. So there is a power
> penalty of these changes.
> 
> Also Mel Gorman provided test results on a prior patchset, which shows
> benifits of this series.
> 
> Srinivas Pandruvada (4):
>   cpufreq: intel_pstate: Add HWP boost utility and sched util hooks
>   cpufreq: intel_pstate: HWP boost performance on IO wakeup
>   cpufreq: intel_pstate: New sysfs entry to control HWP boost
>   cpufreq: intel_pstate: enable boost for SKX
> 
>  drivers/cpufreq/intel_pstate.c | 177 ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++-
>  1 file changed, 173 insertions(+), 4 deletions(-)
> 
> -- 
> 2.13.6
> 
> 

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 13+ messages in thread

* Re: [RFC/RFT] [PATCH v3 4/4] cpufreq: intel_pstate: enable boost for SKX
  2018-05-31 22:51 ` [RFC/RFT] [PATCH v3 4/4] cpufreq: intel_pstate: enable boost for SKX Srinivas Pandruvada
@ 2018-06-01 12:01   ` Giovanni Gherdovich
  2018-06-01 14:57     ` Srinivas Pandruvada
  0 siblings, 1 reply; 13+ messages in thread
From: Giovanni Gherdovich @ 2018-06-01 12:01 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: Srinivas Pandruvada
  Cc: lenb, rjw, peterz, mgorman, linux-pm, linux-kernel, juri.lelli,
	viresh.kumar

On Thu, May 31, 2018 at 03:51:43PM -0700, Srinivas Pandruvada wrote:
> Enable HWP boost on Skylake server platform.
> 
> Signed-off-by: Srinivas Pandruvada <srinivas.pandruvada@linux.intel.com>
> ---
>  drivers/cpufreq/intel_pstate.c | 9 +++++++++
>  1 file changed, 9 insertions(+)
> 
> diff --git a/drivers/cpufreq/intel_pstate.c b/drivers/cpufreq/intel_pstate.c
> index 254e30a6c1e0..75c5a95bc0ac 100644
> --- a/drivers/cpufreq/intel_pstate.c
> +++ b/drivers/cpufreq/intel_pstate.c
> @@ -1794,6 +1794,11 @@ static const struct x86_cpu_id intel_pstate_cpu_ee_disable_ids[] = {
>  	{}
>  };
>  
> +static const struct x86_cpu_id intel_pstate_hwp_boost_ids[] __initconst = {
> +	ICPU(INTEL_FAM6_SKYLAKE_X, core_funcs),
> +	{}
> +};
> +
>  static int intel_pstate_init_cpu(unsigned int cpunum)
>  {
>  	struct cpudata *cpu;
> @@ -1824,6 +1829,10 @@ static int intel_pstate_init_cpu(unsigned int cpunum)
>  			intel_pstate_disable_ee(cpunum);
>  
>  		intel_pstate_hwp_enable(cpu);
> +
> +		id = x86_match_cpu(intel_pstate_hwp_boost_ids);
> +		if (id)
> +			hwp_boost = true;
>  	}
>  
>  	intel_pstate_get_cpu_pstates(cpu);
> -- 
> 2.13.6
> 
> 

I have a Skylake server, HWP capable, but it doesn't trigger this bit; I had
to do "echo 1 > /sys/devices/system/cpu/intel_pstate/hwp_dynamic_boost".

Just out of curiosity, do you see reasons for leaving some SKL out of the
default setting? Or maybe I'm missing something.

/proc/cpuinfo says that the model name is "Intel(R) Xeon(R) CPU E3-1240 v5";
the outputs of `cpuid -1` and `cpuid -1 --raw` are in this pastebin:
http://paste.opensuse.org/view/raw/34255499


Giovanni Gherdovich
SUSE Labs

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 13+ messages in thread

* Re: [RFC/RFT] [PATCH v3 0/4] Intel_pstate: HWP Dynamic performance boost
  2018-06-01 11:32 ` [RFC/RFT] [PATCH v3 0/4] Intel_pstate: HWP Dynamic performance boost Giovanni Gherdovich
@ 2018-06-01 14:57   ` Srinivas Pandruvada
  0 siblings, 0 replies; 13+ messages in thread
From: Srinivas Pandruvada @ 2018-06-01 14:57 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: Giovanni Gherdovich
  Cc: lenb, rjw, peterz, mgorman, linux-pm, linux-kernel, juri.lelli,
	viresh.kumar

Hi Giovanni,

On Fri, 2018-06-01 at 13:32 +0200, Giovanni Gherdovich wrote:
> On Thu, May 31, 2018 at 03:51:39PM -0700, Srinivas Pandruvada wrote:
> > v3
> > - Removed atomic bit operation as suggested.
> > - Added description of contention with user space.
> > - Removed hwp cache, boost utililty function patch and merged with
> > util callback
> >   patch. This way any value set is used somewhere.
> > 
> > Waiting for test results from Mel Gorman, who is the original
> > reporter.
> > 
> 
> Hello Srinivas,
> 
> thanks for this series. I'm testing it on behalf of Mel; while I'm
> waiting for
> more benchmarks to finish, an initial report I've got from dbench on
> ext4
> looks very promising. Good!
> Later when I have it all I'll post my detailed results.
Thanks. 


-Srinivas
> 
> 
> Giovanni Gherdovich
> SUSE Labs
> 
> 
> > v2
> > This is a much simpler version than the previous one and only
> > consider IO
> > boost, using the existing mechanism. There is no change in this
> > series
> > beyond intel_pstate driver.
> > 
> > Once PeterZ finishes his work on frequency invariant, I will
> > revisit
> > thread migration optimization in HWP mode.
> > 
> > Other changes:
> > - Gradual boost instead of single step as suggested by PeterZ.
> > - Cross CPU synchronization concerns identified by Rafael.
> > - Split the patch for HWP MSR value caching as suggested by PeterZ.
> > 
> > Not changed as suggested:
> > There is no architecture way to identify platform with Per-core
> > P-states, so still have to enable feature based on CPU model.
> > 
> > -----------
> > v1
> > 
> > This series tries to address some concern in performance
> > particularly with IO
> > workloads (Reported by Mel Gorman), when HWP is using intel_pstate
> > powersave
> > policy.
> > 
> > Background
> > HWP performance can be controlled by user space using sysfs
> > interface for
> > max/min frequency limits and energy performance preference
> > settings. Based on
> > workload characteristics these can be adjusted from user space.
> > These limits
> > are not changed dynamically by kernel based on workload.
> > 
> > By default HWP defaults to energy performance preference value of
> > 0x80 on
> > majority of platforms(Scale is 0-255, 0 is max performance and 255
> > is min).
> > This value offers best performance/watt and for majority of server
> > workloads
> > performance doesn't suffer. Also users always have option to use
> > performance
> > policy of intel_pstate, to get best performance. But user tend to
> > run with
> > out of box configuration, which is powersave policy on most of the
> > distros.
> > 
> > In some case it is possible to dynamically adjust performance, for
> > example,
> > when a CPU is woken up due to IO completion or thread migrate to a
> > new CPU. In
> > this case HWP algorithm will take some time to build utilization
> > and ramp up
> > P-states. So this may results in lower performance for some IO
> > workloads and
> > workloads which tend to migrate. The idea of this patch series is
> > to
> > temporarily boost performance dynamically in these cases. This is
> > only
> > applicable only when user is using powersave policy, not in
> > performance policy.
> > 
> > Results on a Skylake server:
> > 
> > Benchmark                       Improvement %
> > -----------------------------------------------------------------
> > -----
> > dbench                          50.36
> > thread IO bench (tiobench)      10.35
> > File IO                         9.81
> > sqlite                          15.76
> > X264 -104 cores                 9.75
> > 
> > Spec Power                      (Negligible impact 7382 Vs. 7378)
> > Idle Power                      No change observed
> > -----------------------------------------------------------------
> > ------
> > 
> > HWP brings in best performace/watt at EPP=0x80. Since we are
> > boosting
> > EPP here to 0, the performance/watt drops upto 10%. So there is a
> > power
> > penalty of these changes.
> > 
> > Also Mel Gorman provided test results on a prior patchset, which
> > shows
> > benifits of this series.
> > 
> > Srinivas Pandruvada (4):
> >   cpufreq: intel_pstate: Add HWP boost utility and sched util hooks
> >   cpufreq: intel_pstate: HWP boost performance on IO wakeup
> >   cpufreq: intel_pstate: New sysfs entry to control HWP boost
> >   cpufreq: intel_pstate: enable boost for SKX
> > 
> >  drivers/cpufreq/intel_pstate.c | 177
> > ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++-
> >  1 file changed, 173 insertions(+), 4 deletions(-)
> > 
> > -- 
> > 2.13.6
> > 
> > 

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 13+ messages in thread

* Re: [RFC/RFT] [PATCH v3 4/4] cpufreq: intel_pstate: enable boost for SKX
  2018-06-01 12:01   ` Giovanni Gherdovich
@ 2018-06-01 14:57     ` Srinivas Pandruvada
  0 siblings, 0 replies; 13+ messages in thread
From: Srinivas Pandruvada @ 2018-06-01 14:57 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: Giovanni Gherdovich
  Cc: lenb, rjw, peterz, mgorman, linux-pm, linux-kernel, juri.lelli,
	viresh.kumar

On Fri, 2018-06-01 at 14:01 +0200, Giovanni Gherdovich wrote:
> On Thu, May 31, 2018 at 03:51:43PM -0700, Srinivas Pandruvada wrote:
> > Enable HWP boost on Skylake server platform.
> > 
> > Signed-off-by: Srinivas Pandruvada <srinivas.pandruvada@linux.intel
> > .com>
> > ---
> >  drivers/cpufreq/intel_pstate.c | 9 +++++++++
> >  1 file changed, 9 insertions(+)
> > 
> > diff --git a/drivers/cpufreq/intel_pstate.c
> > b/drivers/cpufreq/intel_pstate.c
> > index 254e30a6c1e0..75c5a95bc0ac 100644
> > --- a/drivers/cpufreq/intel_pstate.c
> > +++ b/drivers/cpufreq/intel_pstate.c
> > @@ -1794,6 +1794,11 @@ static const struct x86_cpu_id
> > intel_pstate_cpu_ee_disable_ids[] = {
> >  	{}
> >  };
> >  
> > +static const struct x86_cpu_id intel_pstate_hwp_boost_ids[]
> > __initconst = {
> > +	ICPU(INTEL_FAM6_SKYLAKE_X, core_funcs),
> > +	{}
> > +};
> > +
> >  static int intel_pstate_init_cpu(unsigned int cpunum)
> >  {
> >  	struct cpudata *cpu;
> > @@ -1824,6 +1829,10 @@ static int intel_pstate_init_cpu(unsigned
> > int cpunum)
> >  			intel_pstate_disable_ee(cpunum);
> >  
> >  		intel_pstate_hwp_enable(cpu);
> > +
> > +		id = x86_match_cpu(intel_pstate_hwp_boost_ids);
> > +		if (id)
> > +			hwp_boost = true;
> >  	}
> >  
> >  	intel_pstate_get_cpu_pstates(cpu);
> > -- 
> > 2.13.6
> > 
> > 
> 
> I have a Skylake server, HWP capable, but it doesn't trigger this
> bit; I had
> to do "echo 1 >
> /sys/devices/system/cpu/intel_pstate/hwp_dynamic_boost".
> 
> Just out of curiosity, do you see reasons for leaving some SKL out of
> the
> default setting? Or maybe I'm missing something.
This is entry level server using SKL desktop CPU model. We will see
some  improvements, but not as big as Xeon E5s. So we can add based on
your test results.

Thanks,
Srinivas

> 
> /proc/cpuinfo says that the model name is "Intel(R) Xeon(R) CPU E3-
> 1240 v5";
> the outputs of `cpuid -1` and `cpuid -1 --raw` are in this pastebin:
> http://paste.opensuse.org/view/raw/34255499


> 
> 
> Giovanni Gherdovich
> SUSE Labs

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 13+ messages in thread

* Re: [RFC/RFT] [PATCH v3 0/4] Intel_pstate: HWP Dynamic performance boost
  2018-05-31 22:51 [RFC/RFT] [PATCH v3 0/4] Intel_pstate: HWP Dynamic performance boost Srinivas Pandruvada
                   ` (4 preceding siblings ...)
  2018-06-01 11:32 ` [RFC/RFT] [PATCH v3 0/4] Intel_pstate: HWP Dynamic performance boost Giovanni Gherdovich
@ 2018-06-04 18:01 ` Giovanni Gherdovich
  2018-06-04 18:24   ` Srinivas Pandruvada
  5 siblings, 1 reply; 13+ messages in thread
From: Giovanni Gherdovich @ 2018-06-04 18:01 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: Srinivas Pandruvada
  Cc: lenb, rjw, peterz, mgorman, linux-pm, linux-kernel, juri.lelli,
	viresh.kumar

On Thu, May 31, 2018 at 03:51:39PM -0700, Srinivas Pandruvada wrote:
> v3
> - Removed atomic bit operation as suggested.
> - Added description of contention with user space.
> - Removed hwp cache, boost utililty function patch and merged with util callback
>   patch. This way any value set is used somewhere.
> 
> Waiting for test results from Mel Gorman, who is the original reporter.
> [SNIP]

Tested-by: Giovanni Gherdovich <ggherdovich@suse.cz>

This series has an overall positive performance impact on IO both on xfs and
ext4, and I'd be vary happy if it lands in v4.18. You dropped the migration
optimization from v1 to v2 after the reviewers' suggestion; I'm looking
forward to test that part too, so please add me to CC when you'll resend it.

I've tested your series on a single socket Xeon E3-1240 v5 (Skylake, 4 cores /
8 threads) with SSD storage. The platform is a Dell PowerEdge R230.

The benchmarks used are a mix of I/O intensive workloads on ext4 and xfs
(dbench4, sqlite, pgbench in read/write and read-only configuration, Flexible
IO aka FIO, etc) and scheduler stressers just to check that everything is okay
in that department too (hackbench, pipetest, schbench, sockperf on localhost
both in "throughput" and "under-load" mode, netperf in localhost, etc). There
is also some HPC with the NAS Parallel Benchmark, as when using openMPI as IPC
mechanism it ends up being write-intensive and that could be a good
experiment, even if the HPC people aren't exactly the target audience for a
frequency governor.

The large improvements are in areas you already highlighted in your cover
letter (dbench4, sqlite, and pgbench read/write too, very impressive
honestly). Minor wins are also observed in sockperf and running the git unit
tests (gitsource below). The scheduler stressers ends up, as expected, in the
"neutral" category where you'll also find FIO (which given other results I'd
have expected to improve a little at least). Marked "neutral" are also those
results where statistical significance wasn't reached (2 standard deviations,
which is roughly like a 0.05 p-value) even if they showed some difference in a
direction or the other. In the "small losses" section I found hackbench run
with processes (not threads) and pipes (not sockets) which I report for due
diligence but looking at the raw numbers it's more of a mixed bag than a real
loss, and the NAS high-perf computing benchmark when it uses openMP (as
opposed to openMPI) for IPC -- but again, we often find that supercomputers
people run the machines at full speed all the time.

At the bottom of this message you'll find some directions if you want to run
some test yourself using the same framework I used, MMTests from
https://github.com/gormanm/mmtests (we store a fair amount of benchmarks
parametrization up there).

Large wins:

    - dbench4:              +20% on ext4,
                            +14% on xfs (always asynch IO)
    - sqlite (insert):       +9% on both ext4 and xfs
    - pgbench (read/write):  +9% on ext4,
                            +10% on xfs

Moderate wins:

    - sockperf (type: under-load, localhost):              +1% with TCP,
                                                           +5% with UDP
    - gisource (git unit tests, shell intensive):          +3% on ext4
    - NAS Parallel Benchmark (HPC, using openMPI, on xfs): +1%
    - tbench4 (network part of dbench4, localhost):        +1%

Neutral:

    - pgbench (read-only) on ext4 and xfs
    - siege
    - netperf (streaming and round-robin) with TCP and UDP
    - hackbench (sockets/process, sockets/thread and pipes/thread)
    - pipetest
    - Linux kernel build
    - schbench
    - sockperf (type: throughput) with TCP and UDP
    - git unit tests on xfs
    - FIO (both random and seq. read, both random and seq. write)
      on ext4 and xfs, async IO

Moderate losses:

    - hackbench (pipes/process):          -10%
    - NAS Parallel Benchmark with openMP:  -1%


Each benchmark is run with a variety of configuration parameters (eg: number
of threads, number of clients, etc); to reach a final "score" the geometric
mean is used (with a few exceptions depending on the type of benchmark).
Detailed results follow. Amean, Hmean and Gmean are respectively arithmetic,
harmonic and geometric means.

For brevity I won't report all tables but only those for "large wins" and
"moderate losses". Note that I'm not overly worried for the hackbench-pipes
situation, as we've studied it in the past and determined that such
configuration is particularly weak, time is mostly spent on contention and the
scheduler code path isn't exercised. See the comment in the file
configs/config-global-dhp__scheduler-unbound in MMTests for a brief
description of the issue.

DBENCH4
=======

NOTES: asyncronous IO; varies the number of clients up to NUMCPUS*8.
MMTESTS CONFIG: global-dhp__io-dbench4-async-{ext4, xfs}
MEASURES: latency (millisecs)
LOWER is better

EXT4
                              4.16.0                 4.16.0
                             vanilla              hwp-boost
Amean      1        28.49 (   0.00%)       19.68 (  30.92%)
Amean      2        26.70 (   0.00%)       25.59 (   4.14%)
Amean      4        54.59 (   0.00%)       43.56 (  20.20%)
Amean      8        91.19 (   0.00%)       77.56 (  14.96%)
Amean      64      538.09 (   0.00%)      438.67 (  18.48%)
Stddev     1         6.70 (   0.00%)        3.24 (  51.66%)
Stddev     2         4.35 (   0.00%)        3.57 (  17.85%)
Stddev     4         7.99 (   0.00%)        7.24 (   9.29%)
Stddev     8        17.51 (   0.00%)       15.80 (   9.78%)
Stddev     64       49.54 (   0.00%)       46.98 (   5.17%)

XFS
                              4.16.0                 4.16.0
                             vanilla              hwp-boost
Amean      1        21.88 (   0.00%)       16.03 (  26.75%)
Amean      2        19.72 (   0.00%)       19.82 (  -0.50%)
Amean      4        37.55 (   0.00%)       29.52 (  21.38%)
Amean      8        56.73 (   0.00%)       51.83 (   8.63%)
Amean      64      808.80 (   0.00%)      698.12 (  13.68%)
Stddev     1         6.29 (   0.00%)        2.33 (  62.99%)
Stddev     2         3.12 (   0.00%)        2.26 (  27.73%)
Stddev     4         7.56 (   0.00%)        5.88 (  22.28%)
Stddev     8        14.15 (   0.00%)       12.49 (  11.71%)
Stddev     64      380.54 (   0.00%)      367.88 (   3.33%)

SQLITE
======

NOTES: SQL insert test on a table that will be 2M in size.
MMTESTS CONFIG: global-dhp__db-sqlite-insert-medium-{ext4, xfs}
MEASURES: transactions per second
HIGHER is better

EXT4
                                4.16.0                 4.16.0
                               vanilla              hwp-boost
Hmean     Trans     2098.79 (   0.00%)     2292.16 (   9.21%)
Stddev    Trans       78.79 (   0.00%)       95.73 ( -21.50%)

XFS
                                4.16.0                 4.16.0
                               vanilla              hwp-boost
Hmean     Trans     1890.27 (   0.00%)     2058.62 (   8.91%)
Stddev    Trans       52.54 (   0.00%)       29.56 (  43.73%)

PGBENCH-RW
==========

NOTES: packaged with Postgres. Varies the number of thread up to NUMCPUS. The
  workload is scaled so that the approximate size is 80% of of the database
  shared buffer which itself is 20% of RAM. The page cache is not flushed
  after the database is populated for the test and starts cache-hot.
MMTESTS CONFIG: global-dhp__db-pgbench-timed-rw-small-{ext4, xfs}
MEASURES: transactions per second
HIGHER is better

EXT4
                            4.16.0                 4.16.0
                           vanilla              hwp-boost
Hmean     1     2692.19 (   0.00%)     2660.98 (  -1.16%)
Hmean     4     5218.93 (   0.00%)     5610.10 (   7.50%)
Hmean     7     7332.68 (   0.00%)     8378.24 (  14.26%)
Hmean     8     7462.03 (   0.00%)     8713.36 (  16.77%)
Stddev    1      231.85 (   0.00%)      257.49 ( -11.06%)
Stddev    4      681.11 (   0.00%)      312.64 (  54.10%)
Stddev    7     1072.07 (   0.00%)      730.29 (  31.88%)
Stddev    8     1472.77 (   0.00%)     1057.34 (  28.21%)

XFS
                            4.16.0                 4.16.0
                           vanilla              hwp-boost
Hmean     1     2675.02 (   0.00%)     2661.69 (  -0.50%)
Hmean     4     5049.45 (   0.00%)     5601.45 (  10.93%)
Hmean     7     7302.18 (   0.00%)     8348.16 (  14.32%)
Hmean     8     7596.83 (   0.00%)     8693.29 (  14.43%)
Stddev    1      225.41 (   0.00%)      246.74 (  -9.46%)
Stddev    4      761.33 (   0.00%)      334.77 (  56.03%)
Stddev    7     1093.93 (   0.00%)      811.30 (  25.84%)
Stddev    8     1465.06 (   0.00%)     1118.81 (  23.63%)

HACKBENCH
=========

NOTES: Varies the number of groups between 1 and NUMCPUS*4
MMTESTS CONFIG: global-dhp__scheduler-unbound
MEASURES: time (seconds)
LOWER is better

                             4.16.0                 4.16.0
                            vanilla              hwp-boost
Amean     1       0.8350 (   0.00%)      1.1577 ( -38.64%)
Amean     3       2.8367 (   0.00%)      3.7457 ( -32.04%)
Amean     5       6.7503 (   0.00%)      5.7977 (  14.11%)
Amean     7       7.8290 (   0.00%)      8.0343 (  -2.62%)
Amean     12     11.0560 (   0.00%)     11.9673 (  -8.24%)
Amean     18     15.2603 (   0.00%)     15.5247 (  -1.73%)
Amean     24     17.0283 (   0.00%)     17.9047 (  -5.15%)
Amean     30     19.9193 (   0.00%)     23.4670 ( -17.81%)
Amean     32     21.4637 (   0.00%)     23.4097 (  -9.07%)
Stddev    1       0.0636 (   0.00%)      0.0255 (  59.93%)
Stddev    3       0.1188 (   0.00%)      0.0235 (  80.22%)
Stddev    5       0.0755 (   0.00%)      0.1398 ( -85.13%)
Stddev    7       0.2778 (   0.00%)      0.1634 (  41.17%)
Stddev    12      0.5785 (   0.00%)      0.1030 (  82.19%)
Stddev    18      1.2099 (   0.00%)      0.7986 (  33.99%)
Stddev    24      0.2057 (   0.00%)      0.7030 (-241.72%)
Stddev    30      1.1303 (   0.00%)      0.7654 (  32.28%)
Stddev    32      0.2032 (   0.00%)      3.1626 (-1456.69%)

NAS PARALLEL BENCHMARK, C-CLASS (w/ openMP)
===========================================

NOTES: The various computational kernels are run separately; see
  https://www.nas.nasa.gov/publications/npb.html for the list of tasks (IS =
  Integer Sort, EP = Embarrassingly Parallel, etc)
MMTESTS CONFIG: global-dhp__nas-c-class-omp-full
MEASURES: time (seconds)
LOWER is better

                               4.16.0                 4.16.0
                              vanilla              hwp-boost
Amean     bt.C      169.82 (   0.00%)      170.54 (  -0.42%)
Stddev    bt.C        1.07 (   0.00%)        0.97 (   9.34%)
Amean     cg.C       41.81 (   0.00%)       42.08 (  -0.65%)
Stddev    cg.C        0.06 (   0.00%)        0.03 (  48.24%)
Amean     ep.C       26.63 (   0.00%)       26.47 (   0.61%)
Stddev    ep.C        0.37 (   0.00%)        0.24 (  35.35%)
Amean     ft.C       38.17 (   0.00%)       38.41 (  -0.64%)
Stddev    ft.C        0.33 (   0.00%)        0.32 (   3.78%)
Amean     is.C        1.49 (   0.00%)        1.40 (   6.02%)
Stddev    is.C        0.20 (   0.00%)        0.16 (  19.40%)
Amean     lu.C      217.46 (   0.00%)      220.21 (  -1.26%)
Stddev    lu.C        0.23 (   0.00%)        0.22 (   0.74%)
Amean     mg.C       18.56 (   0.00%)       18.80 (  -1.31%)
Stddev    mg.C        0.01 (   0.00%)        0.01 (  22.54%)
Amean     sp.C      293.25 (   0.00%)      296.73 (  -1.19%)
Stddev    sp.C        0.10 (   0.00%)        0.06 (  42.67%)
Amean     ua.C      170.74 (   0.00%)      172.02 (  -0.75%)
Stddev    ua.C        0.28 (   0.00%)        0.31 ( -12.89%)

HOW TO REPRODUCE
================

To install MMTests, clone the git repo at
https://github.com/gormanm/mmtests.git

To run a config (ie a set of benchmarks, such as
config-global-dhp__nas-c-class-omp-full), use the command
./run-mmtests.sh --config configs/$CONFIG $MNEMONIC-NAME
from the top-level directory; the benchmark source will be downloaded from its
canonical internet location, compiled and run.

To compare results from two runs, use
./bin/compare-mmtests.pl --directory ./work/log \
                         --benchmark $BENCHMARK-NAME \
			 --names $MNEMONIC-NAME-1,$MNEMONIC-NAME-2
from the top-level directory.



Thanks,
Giovanni Gherdovich
SUSE Labs

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 13+ messages in thread

* Re: [RFC/RFT] [PATCH v3 0/4] Intel_pstate: HWP Dynamic performance boost
  2018-06-04 18:01 ` Giovanni Gherdovich
@ 2018-06-04 18:24   ` Srinivas Pandruvada
  2018-06-05  9:33     ` Rafael J. Wysocki
  0 siblings, 1 reply; 13+ messages in thread
From: Srinivas Pandruvada @ 2018-06-04 18:24 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: Giovanni Gherdovich
  Cc: lenb, rjw, peterz, mgorman, linux-pm, linux-kernel, juri.lelli,
	viresh.kumar

On Mon, 2018-06-04 at 20:01 +0200, Giovanni Gherdovich wrote:
> On Thu, May 31, 2018 at 03:51:39PM -0700, Srinivas Pandruvada wrote:
> > v3
> > - Removed atomic bit operation as suggested.
> > - Added description of contention with user space.
> > - Removed hwp cache, boost utililty function patch and merged with
> > util callback
> >   patch. This way any value set is used somewhere.
> > 
> > Waiting for test results from Mel Gorman, who is the original
> > reporter.
> > [SNIP]
> 
> Tested-by: Giovanni Gherdovich <ggherdovich@suse.cz>
> 
> This series has an overall positive performance impact on IO both on
> xfs and
> ext4, and I'd be vary happy if it lands in v4.18. You dropped the
> migration
> optimization from v1 to v2 after the reviewers' suggestion; I'm
> looking
> forward to test that part too, so please add me to CC when you'll
> resend it.
Thanks Giovanni. Since 4.17 is already released and 4.18 pulls already
started, we have to wait for 4.19.


> 
> I've tested your series on a single socket Xeon E3-1240 v5 (Skylake,
> 4 cores /
> 8 threads) with SSD storage. The platform is a Dell PowerEdge R230.
> 
> The benchmarks used are a mix of I/O intensive workloads on ext4 and
> xfs
> (dbench4, sqlite, pgbench in read/write and read-only configuration,
> Flexible
> IO aka FIO, etc) and scheduler stressers just to check that
> everything is okay
> in that department too (hackbench, pipetest, schbench, sockperf on
> localhost
> both in "throughput" and "under-load" mode, netperf in localhost,
> etc). There
> is also some HPC with the NAS Parallel Benchmark, as when using
> openMPI as IPC
> mechanism it ends up being write-intensive and that could be a good
> experiment, even if the HPC people aren't exactly the target audience
> for a
> frequency governor.
> 
> The large improvements are in areas you already highlighted in your
> cover
> letter (dbench4, sqlite, and pgbench read/write too, very impressive
> honestly). Minor wins are also observed in sockperf and running the
> git unit
> tests (gitsource below). The scheduler stressers ends up, as
> expected, in the
> "neutral" category where you'll also find FIO (which given other
> results I'd
> have expected to improve a little at least). Marked "neutral" are
> also those
> results where statistical significance wasn't reached (2 standard
> deviations,
> which is roughly like a 0.05 p-value) even if they showed some
> difference in a
> direction or the other. In the "small losses" section I found
> hackbench run
> with processes (not threads) and pipes (not sockets) which I report
> for due
> diligence but looking at the raw numbers it's more of a mixed bag
> than a real
> loss, 
I think so. But I will see why there is even difference.

Thanks,
Srinivas

> and the NAS high-perf computing benchmark when it uses openMP (as
> opposed to openMPI) for IPC -- but again, we often find that
> supercomputers
> people run the machines at full speed all the time.
> 
> At the bottom of this message you'll find some directions if you want
> to run
> some test yourself using the same framework I used, MMTests from
> https://github.com/gormanm/mmtests (we store a fair amount of
> benchmarks
> parametrization up there).
> 
> Large wins:
> 
>     - dbench4:              +20% on ext4,
>                             +14% on xfs (always asynch IO)
>     - sqlite (insert):       +9% on both ext4 and xfs
>     - pgbench (read/write):  +9% on ext4,
>                             +10% on xfs
> 
> Moderate wins:
> 
>     - sockperf (type: under-load, localhost):              +1% with
> TCP,
>                                                            +5% with
> UDP
>     - gisource (git unit tests, shell intensive):          +3% on
> ext4
>     - NAS Parallel Benchmark (HPC, using openMPI, on xfs): +1%
>     - tbench4 (network part of dbench4, localhost):        +1%
> 
> Neutral:
> 
>     - pgbench (read-only) on ext4 and xfs
>     - siege
>     - netperf (streaming and round-robin) with TCP and UDP
>     - hackbench (sockets/process, sockets/thread and pipes/thread)
>     - pipetest
>     - Linux kernel build
>     - schbench
>     - sockperf (type: throughput) with TCP and UDP
>     - git unit tests on xfs
>     - FIO (both random and seq. read, both random and seq. write)
>       on ext4 and xfs, async IO
> 
> Moderate losses:
> 
>     - hackbench (pipes/process):          -10%
>     - NAS Parallel Benchmark with openMP:  -1%
> 
> 
> Each benchmark is run with a variety of configuration parameters (eg:
> number
> of threads, number of clients, etc); to reach a final "score" the
> geometric
> mean is used (with a few exceptions depending on the type of
> benchmark).
> Detailed results follow. Amean, Hmean and Gmean are respectively
> arithmetic,
> harmonic and geometric means.
> 
> For brevity I won't report all tables but only those for "large wins"
> and
> "moderate losses". Note that I'm not overly worried for the
> hackbench-pipes
> situation, as we've studied it in the past and determined that such
> configuration is particularly weak, time is mostly spent on
> contention and the
> scheduler code path isn't exercised. See the comment in the file
> configs/config-global-dhp__scheduler-unbound in MMTests for a brief
> description of the issue.
> 
> DBENCH4
> =======
> 
> NOTES: asyncronous IO; varies the number of clients up to NUMCPUS*8.
> MMTESTS CONFIG: global-dhp__io-dbench4-async-{ext4, xfs}
> MEASURES: latency (millisecs)
> LOWER is better
> 
> EXT4
>                               4.16.0                 4.16.0
>                              vanilla              hwp-boost
> Amean      1        28.49 (   0.00%)       19.68 (  30.92%)
> Amean      2        26.70 (   0.00%)       25.59 (   4.14%)
> Amean      4        54.59 (   0.00%)       43.56 (  20.20%)
> Amean      8        91.19 (   0.00%)       77.56 (  14.96%)
> Amean      64      538.09 (   0.00%)      438.67 (  18.48%)
> Stddev     1         6.70 (   0.00%)        3.24 (  51.66%)
> Stddev     2         4.35 (   0.00%)        3.57 (  17.85%)
> Stddev     4         7.99 (   0.00%)        7.24 (   9.29%)
> Stddev     8        17.51 (   0.00%)       15.80 (   9.78%)
> Stddev     64       49.54 (   0.00%)       46.98 (   5.17%)
> 
> XFS
>                               4.16.0                 4.16.0
>                              vanilla              hwp-boost
> Amean      1        21.88 (   0.00%)       16.03 (  26.75%)
> Amean      2        19.72 (   0.00%)       19.82 (  -0.50%)
> Amean      4        37.55 (   0.00%)       29.52 (  21.38%)
> Amean      8        56.73 (   0.00%)       51.83 (   8.63%)
> Amean      64      808.80 (   0.00%)      698.12 (  13.68%)
> Stddev     1         6.29 (   0.00%)        2.33 (  62.99%)
> Stddev     2         3.12 (   0.00%)        2.26 (  27.73%)
> Stddev     4         7.56 (   0.00%)        5.88 (  22.28%)
> Stddev     8        14.15 (   0.00%)       12.49 (  11.71%)
> Stddev     64      380.54 (   0.00%)      367.88 (   3.33%)
> 
> SQLITE
> ======
> 
> NOTES: SQL insert test on a table that will be 2M in size.
> MMTESTS CONFIG: global-dhp__db-sqlite-insert-medium-{ext4, xfs}
> MEASURES: transactions per second
> HIGHER is better
> 
> EXT4
>                                 4.16.0                 4.16.0
>                                vanilla              hwp-boost
> Hmean     Trans     2098.79 (   0.00%)     2292.16 (   9.21%)
> Stddev    Trans       78.79 (   0.00%)       95.73 ( -21.50%)
> 
> XFS
>                                 4.16.0                 4.16.0
>                                vanilla              hwp-boost
> Hmean     Trans     1890.27 (   0.00%)     2058.62 (   8.91%)
> Stddev    Trans       52.54 (   0.00%)       29.56 (  43.73%)
> 
> PGBENCH-RW
> ==========
> 
> NOTES: packaged with Postgres. Varies the number of thread up to
> NUMCPUS. The
>   workload is scaled so that the approximate size is 80% of of the
> database
>   shared buffer which itself is 20% of RAM. The page cache is not
> flushed
>   after the database is populated for the test and starts cache-hot.
> MMTESTS CONFIG: global-dhp__db-pgbench-timed-rw-small-{ext4, xfs}
> MEASURES: transactions per second
> HIGHER is better
> 
> EXT4
>                             4.16.0                 4.16.0
>                            vanilla              hwp-boost
> Hmean     1     2692.19 (   0.00%)     2660.98 (  -1.16%)
> Hmean     4     5218.93 (   0.00%)     5610.10 (   7.50%)
> Hmean     7     7332.68 (   0.00%)     8378.24 (  14.26%)
> Hmean     8     7462.03 (   0.00%)     8713.36 (  16.77%)
> Stddev    1      231.85 (   0.00%)      257.49 ( -11.06%)
> Stddev    4      681.11 (   0.00%)      312.64 (  54.10%)
> Stddev    7     1072.07 (   0.00%)      730.29 (  31.88%)
> Stddev    8     1472.77 (   0.00%)     1057.34 (  28.21%)
> 
> XFS
>                             4.16.0                 4.16.0
>                            vanilla              hwp-boost
> Hmean     1     2675.02 (   0.00%)     2661.69 (  -0.50%)
> Hmean     4     5049.45 (   0.00%)     5601.45 (  10.93%)
> Hmean     7     7302.18 (   0.00%)     8348.16 (  14.32%)
> Hmean     8     7596.83 (   0.00%)     8693.29 (  14.43%)
> Stddev    1      225.41 (   0.00%)      246.74 (  -9.46%)
> Stddev    4      761.33 (   0.00%)      334.77 (  56.03%)
> Stddev    7     1093.93 (   0.00%)      811.30 (  25.84%)
> Stddev    8     1465.06 (   0.00%)     1118.81 (  23.63%)
> 
> HACKBENCH
> =========
> 
> NOTES: Varies the number of groups between 1 and NUMCPUS*4
> MMTESTS CONFIG: global-dhp__scheduler-unbound
> MEASURES: time (seconds)
> LOWER is better
> 
>                              4.16.0                 4.16.0
>                             vanilla              hwp-boost
> Amean     1       0.8350 (   0.00%)      1.1577 ( -38.64%)
> Amean     3       2.8367 (   0.00%)      3.7457 ( -32.04%)
> Amean     5       6.7503 (   0.00%)      5.7977 (  14.11%)
> Amean     7       7.8290 (   0.00%)      8.0343 (  -2.62%)
> Amean     12     11.0560 (   0.00%)     11.9673 (  -8.24%)
> Amean     18     15.2603 (   0.00%)     15.5247 (  -1.73%)
> Amean     24     17.0283 (   0.00%)     17.9047 (  -5.15%)
> Amean     30     19.9193 (   0.00%)     23.4670 ( -17.81%)
> Amean     32     21.4637 (   0.00%)     23.4097 (  -9.07%)
> Stddev    1       0.0636 (   0.00%)      0.0255 (  59.93%)
> Stddev    3       0.1188 (   0.00%)      0.0235 (  80.22%)
> Stddev    5       0.0755 (   0.00%)      0.1398 ( -85.13%)
> Stddev    7       0.2778 (   0.00%)      0.1634 (  41.17%)
> Stddev    12      0.5785 (   0.00%)      0.1030 (  82.19%)
> Stddev    18      1.2099 (   0.00%)      0.7986 (  33.99%)
> Stddev    24      0.2057 (   0.00%)      0.7030 (-241.72%)
> Stddev    30      1.1303 (   0.00%)      0.7654 (  32.28%)
> Stddev    32      0.2032 (   0.00%)      3.1626 (-1456.69%)
> 
> NAS PARALLEL BENCHMARK, C-CLASS (w/ openMP)
> ===========================================
> 
> NOTES: The various computational kernels are run separately; see
>   https://www.nas.nasa.gov/publications/npb.html for the list of
> tasks (IS =
>   Integer Sort, EP = Embarrassingly Parallel, etc)
> MMTESTS CONFIG: global-dhp__nas-c-class-omp-full
> MEASURES: time (seconds)
> LOWER is better
> 
>                                4.16.0                 4.16.0
>                               vanilla              hwp-boost
> Amean     bt.C      169.82 (   0.00%)      170.54 (  -0.42%)
> Stddev    bt.C        1.07 (   0.00%)        0.97 (   9.34%)
> Amean     cg.C       41.81 (   0.00%)       42.08 (  -0.65%)
> Stddev    cg.C        0.06 (   0.00%)        0.03 (  48.24%)
> Amean     ep.C       26.63 (   0.00%)       26.47 (   0.61%)
> Stddev    ep.C        0.37 (   0.00%)        0.24 (  35.35%)
> Amean     ft.C       38.17 (   0.00%)       38.41 (  -0.64%)
> Stddev    ft.C        0.33 (   0.00%)        0.32 (   3.78%)
> Amean     is.C        1.49 (   0.00%)        1.40 (   6.02%)
> Stddev    is.C        0.20 (   0.00%)        0.16 (  19.40%)
> Amean     lu.C      217.46 (   0.00%)      220.21 (  -1.26%)
> Stddev    lu.C        0.23 (   0.00%)        0.22 (   0.74%)
> Amean     mg.C       18.56 (   0.00%)       18.80 (  -1.31%)
> Stddev    mg.C        0.01 (   0.00%)        0.01 (  22.54%)
> Amean     sp.C      293.25 (   0.00%)      296.73 (  -1.19%)
> Stddev    sp.C        0.10 (   0.00%)        0.06 (  42.67%)
> Amean     ua.C      170.74 (   0.00%)      172.02 (  -0.75%)
> Stddev    ua.C        0.28 (   0.00%)        0.31 ( -12.89%)
> 
> HOW TO REPRODUCE
> ================
> 
> To install MMTests, clone the git repo at
> https://github.com/gormanm/mmtests.git
> 
> To run a config (ie a set of benchmarks, such as
> config-global-dhp__nas-c-class-omp-full), use the command
> ./run-mmtests.sh --config configs/$CONFIG $MNEMONIC-NAME
> from the top-level directory; the benchmark source will be downloaded
> from its
> canonical internet location, compiled and run.
> 
> To compare results from two runs, use
> ./bin/compare-mmtests.pl --directory ./work/log \
>                          --benchmark $BENCHMARK-NAME \
> 			 --names $MNEMONIC-NAME-1,$MNEMONIC-NAME-2
> from the top-level directory.
> 
> 
> 
> Thanks,
> Giovanni Gherdovich
> SUSE Labs

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 13+ messages in thread

* Re: [RFC/RFT] [PATCH v3 1/4] cpufreq: intel_pstate: Add HWP boost utility and sched util hooks
  2018-05-31 22:51 ` [RFC/RFT] [PATCH v3 1/4] cpufreq: intel_pstate: Add HWP boost utility and sched util hooks Srinivas Pandruvada
@ 2018-06-05  9:27   ` Rafael J. Wysocki
  0 siblings, 0 replies; 13+ messages in thread
From: Rafael J. Wysocki @ 2018-06-05  9:27 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: Srinivas Pandruvada
  Cc: Len Brown, Rafael J. Wysocki, Peter Zijlstra, Mel Gorman,
	Linux PM, Linux Kernel Mailing List, Juri Lelli, Viresh Kumar

On Fri, Jun 1, 2018 at 12:51 AM, Srinivas Pandruvada
<srinivas.pandruvada@linux.intel.com> wrote:
> Added two utility functions to HWP boost up gradually and boost down to
> the default cached HWP request values.
>
> Boost up:
> Boost up updates HWP request minimum value in steps. This minimum value
> can reach upto at HWP request maximum values depends on how frequently,
> this boost up function is called. At max, boost up will take three steps
> to reach the maximum, depending on the current HWP request levels and HWP
> capabilities. For example, if the current settings are:
> If P0 (Turbo max) = P1 (Guaranteed max) = min
>         No boost at all.
> If P0 (Turbo max) > P1 (Guaranteed max) = min
>         Should result in one level boost only for P0.
> If P0 (Turbo max) = P1 (Guaranteed max) > min
>         Should result in two level boost:
>                 (min + p1)/2 and P1.
> If P0 (Turbo max) > P1 (Guaranteed max) > min
>         Should result in three level boost:
>                 (min + p1)/2, P1 and P0.
> We don't set any level between P0 and P1 as there is no guarantee that
> they will be honored.
>
> Boost down:
> After the system is idle for hold time of 3ms, the HWP request is reset
> to the default value from HWP init or user modified one via sysfs.
>
> Caching of HWP Request and Capabilities
> Store the HWP request value last set using MSR_HWP_REQUEST and read
> MSR_HWP_CAPABILITIES. This avoid reading of MSRs in the boost utility
> functions.
>
> These boost utility functions calculated limits are based on the latest
> HWP request value, which can be modified by setpolicy() callback. So if
> user space modifies the minimum perf value, that will be accounted for
> every time the boost up is called. There will be case when there can be
> contention with the user modified minimum perf, in that case user value
> will gain precedence. For example just before HWP_REQUEST MSR is updated
> from setpolicy() callback, the boost up function is called via scheduler
> tick callback. Here the cached MSR value is already the latest and limits
> are updated based on the latest user limits, but on return the MSR write
> callback called from setpolicy() callback will update the HWP_REQUEST
> value. This will be used till next time the boost up function is called.
>
> In addition add a variable to control HWP dynamic boosting. When HWP
> dynamic boost is active then set the HWP specific update util hook. The
> contents in the utility hooks will be filled in the subsequent patches.
>
> Signed-off-by: Srinivas Pandruvada <srinivas.pandruvada@linux.intel.com>
> ---
>  drivers/cpufreq/intel_pstate.c | 99 ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++--
>  1 file changed, 95 insertions(+), 4 deletions(-)
>
> diff --git a/drivers/cpufreq/intel_pstate.c b/drivers/cpufreq/intel_pstate.c
> index 17e566afbb41..80bf61ae4b1f 100644
> --- a/drivers/cpufreq/intel_pstate.c
> +++ b/drivers/cpufreq/intel_pstate.c
> @@ -221,6 +221,9 @@ struct global_params {
>   *                     preference/bias
>   * @epp_saved:         Saved EPP/EPB during system suspend or CPU offline
>   *                     operation
> + * @hwp_req_cached:    Cached value of the last HWP Request MSR
> + * @hwp_cap_cached:    Cached value of the last HWP Capabilities MSR
> + * @hwp_boost_min:     Last HWP boosted min performance
>   *
>   * This structure stores per CPU instance data for all CPUs.
>   */
> @@ -253,6 +256,9 @@ struct cpudata {
>         s16 epp_policy;
>         s16 epp_default;
>         s16 epp_saved;
> +       u64 hwp_req_cached;
> +       u64 hwp_cap_cached;
> +       int hwp_boost_min;

Why int?  That's a register value, so maybe u32?

>  };
>
>  static struct cpudata **all_cpu_data;
> @@ -285,6 +291,7 @@ static struct pstate_funcs pstate_funcs __read_mostly;
>
>  static int hwp_active __read_mostly;
>  static bool per_cpu_limits __read_mostly;
> +static bool hwp_boost __read_mostly;
>
>  static struct cpufreq_driver *intel_pstate_driver __read_mostly;
>
> @@ -689,6 +696,7 @@ static void intel_pstate_get_hwp_max(unsigned int cpu, int *phy_max,
>         u64 cap;
>
>         rdmsrl_on_cpu(cpu, MSR_HWP_CAPABILITIES, &cap);
> +       WRITE_ONCE(all_cpu_data[cpu]->hwp_cap_cached, cap);
>         if (global.no_turbo)
>                 *current_max = HWP_GUARANTEED_PERF(cap);
>         else
> @@ -763,6 +771,7 @@ static void intel_pstate_hwp_set(unsigned int cpu)
>                 intel_pstate_set_epb(cpu, epp);
>         }
>  skip_epp:
> +       WRITE_ONCE(cpu_data->hwp_req_cached, value);
>         wrmsrl_on_cpu(cpu, MSR_HWP_REQUEST, value);
>  }
>
> @@ -1381,6 +1390,81 @@ static void intel_pstate_get_cpu_pstates(struct cpudata *cpu)
>         intel_pstate_set_min_pstate(cpu);
>  }
>
> +/*
> + * Long hold time will keep high perf limits for long time,
> + * which negatively impacts perf/watt for some workloads,
> + * like specpower. 3ms is based on experiements on some
> + * workoads.
> + */
> +static int hwp_boost_hold_time_ms = 3;
> +
> +static inline void intel_pstate_hwp_boost_up(struct cpudata *cpu)
> +{
> +       u64 hwp_req = READ_ONCE(cpu->hwp_req_cached);
> +       int max_limit = (hwp_req & 0xff00) >> 8;
> +       int min_limit = (hwp_req & 0xff);
> +       int boost_level1;
> +
> +       /*
> +        * Cases to consider (User changes via sysfs or boot time):
> +        * If, P0 (Turbo max) = P1 (Guaranteed max) = min:
> +        *      No boost, return.
> +        * If, P0 (Turbo max) > P1 (Guaranteed max) = min:
> +        *     Should result in one level boost only for P0.
> +        * If, P0 (Turbo max) = P1 (Guaranteed max) > min:
> +        *     Should result in two level boost:
> +        *         (min + p1)/2 and P1.
> +        * If, P0 (Turbo max) > P1 (Guaranteed max) > min:
> +        *     Should result in three level boost:
> +        *        (min + p1)/2, P1 and P0.
> +        */
> +
> +       /* If max and min are equal or already at max, nothing to boost */
> +       if (max_limit == min_limit || cpu->hwp_boost_min >= max_limit)
> +               return;
> +
> +       if (!cpu->hwp_boost_min)
> +               cpu->hwp_boost_min = min_limit;
> +
> +       /* level at half way mark between min and guranteed */
> +       boost_level1 = (HWP_GUARANTEED_PERF(cpu->hwp_cap_cached) + min_limit) >> 1;
> +
> +       if (cpu->hwp_boost_min < boost_level1)
> +               cpu->hwp_boost_min = boost_level1;
> +       else if (cpu->hwp_boost_min < HWP_GUARANTEED_PERF(cpu->hwp_cap_cached))
> +               cpu->hwp_boost_min = HWP_GUARANTEED_PERF(cpu->hwp_cap_cached);
> +       else if (cpu->hwp_boost_min == HWP_GUARANTEED_PERF(cpu->hwp_cap_cached) &&
> +                max_limit != HWP_GUARANTEED_PERF(cpu->hwp_cap_cached))
> +               cpu->hwp_boost_min = max_limit;
> +       else
> +               return;
> +
> +       hwp_req = (hwp_req & ~GENMASK_ULL(7, 0)) | cpu->hwp_boost_min;
> +       wrmsrl(MSR_HWP_REQUEST, hwp_req);
> +       cpu->last_update = cpu->sample.time;
> +}
> +
> +static inline void intel_pstate_hwp_boost_down(struct cpudata *cpu)
> +{
> +       if (cpu->hwp_boost_min) {
> +               bool expired;
> +
> +               /* Check if we are idle for hold time to boost down */
> +               expired = time_after64(cpu->sample.time, cpu->last_update +
> +                                      (hwp_boost_hold_time_ms * NSEC_PER_MSEC));

It would be good to avoid the multiplication here as it will just add
overhead for no value.

> +               if (expired) {
> +                       wrmsrl(MSR_HWP_REQUEST, cpu->hwp_req_cached);
> +                       cpu->hwp_boost_min = 0;
> +               }
> +       }
> +       cpu->last_update = cpu->sample.time;
> +}
> +
> +static inline void intel_pstate_update_util_hwp(struct update_util_data *data,
> +                                               u64 time, unsigned int flags)
> +{
> +}
> +
>  static inline void intel_pstate_calc_avg_perf(struct cpudata *cpu)
>  {
>         struct sample *sample = &cpu->sample;
> @@ -1684,7 +1768,7 @@ static void intel_pstate_set_update_util_hook(unsigned int cpu_num)
>  {
>         struct cpudata *cpu = all_cpu_data[cpu_num];
>
> -       if (hwp_active)
> +       if (hwp_active && !hwp_boost)
>                 return;
>
>         if (cpu->update_util_set)
> @@ -1692,8 +1776,12 @@ static void intel_pstate_set_update_util_hook(unsigned int cpu_num)
>
>         /* Prevent intel_pstate_update_util() from using stale data. */
>         cpu->sample.time = 0;
> -       cpufreq_add_update_util_hook(cpu_num, &cpu->update_util,
> -                                    intel_pstate_update_util);
> +       if (hwp_active)
> +               cpufreq_add_update_util_hook(cpu_num, &cpu->update_util,
> +                                            intel_pstate_update_util_hwp);
> +       else
> +               cpufreq_add_update_util_hook(cpu_num, &cpu->update_util,
> +                                            intel_pstate_update_util);

You can use the ternary operator in the third arg of
cpufreq_add_update_util_hook().

>         cpu->update_util_set = true;
>  }
>
> @@ -1805,8 +1893,11 @@ static int intel_pstate_set_policy(struct cpufreq_policy *policy)
>                 intel_pstate_set_update_util_hook(policy->cpu);
>         }
>
> -       if (hwp_active)
> +       if (hwp_active) {
> +               if (!hwp_boost)
> +                       intel_pstate_clear_update_util_hook(policy->cpu);

This can be called unconditionally as the cpu_data->update_util_set
check will make it return immediately anyway AFAICS.

>                 intel_pstate_hwp_set(policy->cpu);
> +       }
>
>         mutex_unlock(&intel_pstate_limits_lock);
>
> --

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 13+ messages in thread

* Re: [RFC/RFT] [PATCH v3 0/4] Intel_pstate: HWP Dynamic performance boost
  2018-06-04 18:24   ` Srinivas Pandruvada
@ 2018-06-05  9:33     ` Rafael J. Wysocki
  0 siblings, 0 replies; 13+ messages in thread
From: Rafael J. Wysocki @ 2018-06-05  9:33 UTC (permalink / raw)
  To: Srinivas Pandruvada
  Cc: Giovanni Gherdovich, Len Brown, Rafael J. Wysocki,
	Peter Zijlstra, Mel Gorman, Linux PM, Linux Kernel Mailing List,
	Juri Lelli, Viresh Kumar

On Mon, Jun 4, 2018 at 8:24 PM, Srinivas Pandruvada
<srinivas.pandruvada@linux.intel.com> wrote:
> On Mon, 2018-06-04 at 20:01 +0200, Giovanni Gherdovich wrote:
>> On Thu, May 31, 2018 at 03:51:39PM -0700, Srinivas Pandruvada wrote:
>> > v3
>> > - Removed atomic bit operation as suggested.
>> > - Added description of contention with user space.
>> > - Removed hwp cache, boost utililty function patch and merged with
>> > util callback
>> >   patch. This way any value set is used somewhere.
>> >
>> > Waiting for test results from Mel Gorman, who is the original
>> > reporter.
>> > [SNIP]
>>
>> Tested-by: Giovanni Gherdovich <ggherdovich@suse.cz>
>>
>> This series has an overall positive performance impact on IO both on
>> xfs and
>> ext4, and I'd be vary happy if it lands in v4.18. You dropped the
>> migration
>> optimization from v1 to v2 after the reviewers' suggestion; I'm
>> looking
>> forward to test that part too, so please add me to CC when you'll
>> resend it.
> Thanks Giovanni. Since 4.17 is already released and 4.18 pulls already
> started, we have to wait for 4.19.

Not necessarily. :-)

It has been in the works for quite a while and we have another week of
the merge window ahead of us.

Please resubmit the series with the minor issues in the first patch
addressed and with the RFC/RFT tag removed.

Cheers,
Rafael

^ permalink raw reply	[flat|nested] 13+ messages in thread

end of thread, other threads:[~2018-06-05  9:33 UTC | newest]

Thread overview: 13+ messages (download: mbox.gz / follow: Atom feed)
-- links below jump to the message on this page --
2018-05-31 22:51 [RFC/RFT] [PATCH v3 0/4] Intel_pstate: HWP Dynamic performance boost Srinivas Pandruvada
2018-05-31 22:51 ` [RFC/RFT] [PATCH v3 1/4] cpufreq: intel_pstate: Add HWP boost utility and sched util hooks Srinivas Pandruvada
2018-06-05  9:27   ` Rafael J. Wysocki
2018-05-31 22:51 ` [RFC/RFT] [PATCH v3 2/4] cpufreq: intel_pstate: HWP boost performance on IO wakeup Srinivas Pandruvada
2018-05-31 22:51 ` [RFC/RFT] [PATCH v3 3/4] cpufreq: intel_pstate: New sysfs entry to control HWP boost Srinivas Pandruvada
2018-05-31 22:51 ` [RFC/RFT] [PATCH v3 4/4] cpufreq: intel_pstate: enable boost for SKX Srinivas Pandruvada
2018-06-01 12:01   ` Giovanni Gherdovich
2018-06-01 14:57     ` Srinivas Pandruvada
2018-06-01 11:32 ` [RFC/RFT] [PATCH v3 0/4] Intel_pstate: HWP Dynamic performance boost Giovanni Gherdovich
2018-06-01 14:57   ` Srinivas Pandruvada
2018-06-04 18:01 ` Giovanni Gherdovich
2018-06-04 18:24   ` Srinivas Pandruvada
2018-06-05  9:33     ` Rafael J. Wysocki

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